CAR TALK

one-on-one layout.png
one-on-one layout.png
one-on-one layout.png
one-on-one layout.png
one-on-one layout.png
one-on-one layout.png
one-on-one layout.png

PURPOSE

To a) get everyone speaking, and b) demonstrate the difference between a conversation and a presentation.

OVERVIEW

Participants sit side by side (car-style) and take turns delivering an impromptu, 1-minute speech. They repeat the speech, this time standing (lecture-style), then reflect on the differences between Rounds 1 & 2.

Car Talk

(To start, ask people to sit next to a partner, like they’re sitting in a car. Clarify who is the Driver and the Passenger.)

All right, Passengers, in a moment, you’re going to take 60 seconds to tell your partner about someone with whom you have the best conversations. Ready, here we go.

 

(. . . One minute later.)

 

Now Drivers, same thing: tell your partner about someone with whom you have the best conversations. Only let’s say you’re in a self-driving car, okay? So you don’t have to drive. Ready? Here we go.

 

(. . . One minute later.)

 

Okay, Take 2. So Passengers, same words again, more or less, only this time, (demonstrating) after a sentence or two, you’ll stand, take three or four steps away, then turn and face your partner, continuing to talk the whole time.”


(. . . One minute later, repeat Take 2 for Drivers.

Demo This

Ad Lib

We use Car Talk to help people feel the difference between a conversation and a presentation. Now we’re going to take a moment to reflect on that shift, so please get out your notebooks . . .

 

Think back to when you were a Speaker and you moved from sitting to standing: what’s one thing that you noticed:

In your body?

And one thing you noticed in your mind?

And can you remember one thing your Listener did while you were speaking?

 

Now how about when you were a Listener? Was there something the speaker did that:

Caught your attention?

One thing that distracted you?

Can you think of one thing you did as a Listener that might have affected the speaker?